Wobenzym and Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN) for Pain Management and Immune System Health

Wobenzyme – This little gem is amazing for pain control as well as being a digestive enzyme and has been revolutionary in pain management in Europe for years. I use the Wobenzyme P on an empty stomach and it has really helped to keep my chronic pain manageable, not really a complete pain eliminator but when  used in conjunction with Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN) my overall pain has decreased to a level where I can now reduce the amount of the heavy hitting pharmaceuticals to a bare minimum. I am not an expert on how Wobenzyme works but I do know if you take on an empty stomach it seems to go to the source of your pain and take the anger out of the joint or joints. German ingenuity at its best so check it out at www.wobenzym.com.

Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN)  –

I take 3mgs of Naltrexone at bedtime. It again helps with chronic pain management. It was approved by the FDA in 1984 in a 50mg dose for helping heroin or opium addicts, by blocking the effects of the opioides. By blocking opioid receptors, naltrexone also blocks the reception of the opioid hormones that our brain and adrenal glands produce: beta-endorphin and metenkephalin. Many body tissues have receptors for these endorphins and enkephalins, including virtually every cell of the body’s immune system. By blocking these receptors the brain is tricked into producing more of these endorphins which once the effects of the LDN wear off them our brain and body gets a double whammy of feel good hormones to help us with deal with pain and illness.

In 1985,  a physician with a clinical practice in New York City, discovered the effects of a much smaller dose of naltrexone (approximately 3mg once a day) on the body’s immune system. He found that this low dose, taken at bedtime, was able to enhance a patient’s response to infection by HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. [Note: Subsequently, the optimal adult dosage of LDN has been found to be 4.5mg.]

In the mid-1990’s, Dr. Bihari found that patients in his practice with cancer (such as lymphoma or pancreatic cancer) could benefit, in some cases dramatically, from LDN. In addition, people who had an autoimmune disease (such as lupus) often showed prompt control of disease activity while taking LDN. Recently Lyme disease patients are using LDN for pain management as well as Immune System fortification.

Naltrexone itself was approved by the FDA in 1984 in a 50mg dose for the purpose of helping heroin or opium addicts, by blocking the effect of such drugs. By blocking opioid receptors, naltrexone also blocks the reception of the opioid hormones that our brain and adrenal glands produce: beta-endorphin and metenkephalin. Many body tissues have receptors for these endorphins and enkephalins, including virtually every cell of the body’s immune system.

 

http://www.lowdosenaltrexone.org/index.htm



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